вторник, 1 марта 2016 г.

Advanced gluteus medius exercise for low back and knee issues.

Advanced gluteus medius exercise for low back and knee issues.


Advanced gluteus medius exercise for low back and knee issues.


The gluteus medius muscle is a primary stabilizer of the hip and when weak has been found to correlate with low back pain, hip pain, and knee pain. If you had to lose one muscle this would not be a good one to give up.


I frequently find that the gluteus medius muscle is weak in clients, irrespective of age, and aim to strengthen it along with the gluteus maximus.


What Makes the Gluteus Medius so Important?


Two big reasons.


1. It helps keep your pelvis & spine steady.


How often are you on one leg? More than you might imagine\u2013walking, going up/down stairs, and running all involve lots of brief moments standing on one foot. Thankfully, we don’t topple over like the Tower of Pisa with each stride.


The gluteus medius plays a huge role here. It works on the supporting-side leg to pull that side of the pelvis down to keep the unsupported side of the pelvis up (kind of like a diving board extends over a pool, held down at one end to keep the free bouncy end up).


If gluteus medius is in poor shape, the pelvis is likely to experience more jarring with each step. Multiply that by how many steps per day?


Next consider that your spine sits on your pelvis. It’s the difference between driving on a road filled with potholes or one with great asphalt. The former doesn’t bode well for low back and hip problems.


2. It helps keep your knee from falling inwards.


On the down-side leg, the gluteus medius also pulls the thigh (and effectively the knee) outward to prevent it from collapsing towards the other leg. This is important for evenly distributing force through the knee and also to maintain proper tracking of the kneecap or patella.


A knee that falls in will also impact the position of the ankle and, unsurprisingly, a weak gluteus medius has also been found to be related to ankle sprains. This muscle may serve to help prevent inversion sprains by preventing the body from shifting too far outward past the ankle.


Strengthen the Gluteus Medius


One of the most effective exercises for the strengthening the gluteus medius is a single leg squat. This is an advanced exercise and it should be performed pain-free. (Just getting started? Try this beginning gluteus medius exercise).


Instructions for the single leg squat are listed in the video below. I want to emphasize that form is crucial. Poor form effectively continues the pattern of a weak gluteus medius and will not lead to progress. Also note that there is a point on the way down where the knee will fall in and/or the unsupported side of the pelvis will significantly drop. Stop before this point and come back up to get the most from the exercise.


One bonus note that is not mentioned in the video: See if you can keep your pelvis at an equal height from side to side (or left/right\u2013as mentioned, the unsupported side will want to drop).


In addition to the gluteus medius, the single leg squat is also a great exercise for the the quads and for gluteus maximus. The single leg squat elicits significantly more glute activity than a regular squat.


Try out these other exercises for knee stability too. Though designed for Runner’s knee (patellofemoral pain syndrome), this program can serve as a great starting place for strength training the knee stabilizers.


Questions? Comments?


Want to know more? Check these out:


-Is a weak butt contributing to your knee pain?


-Top 3 back saving lifting methods


-The importance of trapezius strength in pain-free overhead shoulder motion


References:


Souza, RB, & Powers, CM (2009). Differences in Hip Kinematics,Muscle Strength, and Muscle Activation Between Subjects With and Without Patellofemoral Pain. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther, 39, 12-19.


Krause DA, Jacobs RS, Pilger KE, Sather BR, Sibunka SP, Hollman JH. (2009). Electromyographic analysis of the gluteus medius in five weight-bearing exercises. J Strength Cond Res., 23,2689-94.


Original article and pictures take http://www.integrativepersonaltraining.com/blog/single-leg-squat-gluteus-medius site

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