понедельник, 29 августа 2016 г.

Some athletes will say that the marathon taper is the most challenging part of training. It is also a vital component to your overall marathon training.

Some athletes will say that the marathon taper is the most challenging part of training. It is also a vital component to your overall marathon training.


Some athletes will say that the marathon taper is the most challenging part of training. It is also a vital component to your overall marathon training.


I have a love-hate relationship with the taper. I look forward to the lower mileage but then doubt starts to sneak into my head. Did I do enough to prepare? Am I ready?


Wendy@Taking the Long Way Home recently posted\u2026Why Can’t We All Just Get Along?


Exactly. It’s one of the hardest (mentally) part of training. We need to trust in our training, let our bodies rest and repair, and the miracle of science will do the rest. (Is “miracle of science”an oxymoron?)


Debbie Woodruff recently posted\u2026The Art (and some science) of the Marathon Taper


If anything I’m probably guilty of doing too much taper. After the intensity of the past weeks, I look forward to the reduced mileage.


Jen @ Pretty Little Grub recently posted\u2026Coconut Almond Crusted Halibut with Mango Avocado Salsa


Sometimes resting sounds like a great idea! I have reached a point in my life (well, age) and training that I really appreciate the taper.


Debbie Woodruff recently posted\u2026The Art (and some science) of the Marathon Taper


Great tips. I have never ran a marathon only a half but I’m sure these techniques can be applied to that as well.


Ivanna recently posted\u2026prAna Fall Style Look Book


They can, generally. I usually do a two week taper for a half marathon, or even 10 days, depending on how hard I trained. But the concept is the same.


Debbie Woodruff recently posted\u2026The Art (and some science) of the Marathon Taper


Awesome! Thanks Debbie.


Ivanna recently posted\u2026prAna Fall Style Look Book


Since I modify plans to suit my schedule, I often don’t know exactly what mileage to do. This is a great help. I never know exactly what to do leading up to the actual race!


Great info Debbie! Sharing!


Tricia Vaughn recently posted\u2026My 3D Body Scan


Thank you. I’m glad you find it helpful!


Debbie Woodruff recently posted\u2026The Art (and some science) of the Marathon Taper


This is all great information- it really is an art!


Annmarie recently posted\u2026DVRT Ultimate Sandbag WOD for Runners


Thanks! Learning your body and what it needs is an art, with a little scientific help on the side.


Debbie Woodruff recently posted\u2026The Art (and some science) of the Marathon Taper


I personally don’t have a problem with taper. Well, I take that back, I get used to and love my long runs, so that is where I have issues with stay chill. But otherwise I am pretty good about it. Great breakdown of taper!


Susie @ SuzLyfe recently posted\u2026Five Ways to Improve Your Running Right Now


Thanks. These days I love my taper very much.


Debbie Woodruff recently posted\u2026The Art (and some science) of the Marathon Taper


I think the taper is so tricky\u2026and so different for each runner. I actually look forward to the taper (call me weird), but by that point I know I have done all that I can for my race. Any excess miles or speed drills serve no purpose and greatly increase the chance of injury. Great explanations!


Kimberly Hatting recently posted\u2026Let’s Get Radical


You’re a smart woman. It’s hard sometimes to realize that it’s important to let your body recover and that you won’t lose fitness because of it.


Debbie Woodruff recently posted\u2026The Art (and some science) of the Marathon Taper


Great information! I’ve always felt a sense of relief when I reached the taper. But then those niggles start putting doubts in my head. I seem to tend to eat too much then too.


Marcia recently posted\u20265 Reasons to Love Sparkling Mineral Water


It’s so common to have those doubts! Just having faith in your training is key to feeling good about tapering.


Debbie Woodruff recently posted\u2026The Art (and some science) of the Marathon Taper


I’ve heard that a lot of people get the taper crazies, but I love taper time! It means it’s time to ease off a bit and let my body get ready for what it’s been working so hard for.


Exactly! Smart woman!


Debbie Woodruff recently posted\u2026The Art (and some science) of the Marathon Taper


I’ve not done a full marathon yet -or ever probably-but I think these tips are applicable to other distances as well and to triathlons. Thanks for sharing!


Deborah @ Confessions of a mother runner recently posted\u2026Reston Century Bike Ride & Sassy Cyclist


They are! After any hard training cycle giving your body a period of lighter training and recovery improves performance.


Debbie Woodruff recently posted\u2026The Art (and some science) of the Marathon Taper


I suppose an upside to taking a running break is not worrying about the taper crazies. Ha.


Ange recently posted\u2026Polar M600 All I’ve Ever Wanted in a Fitness Watch


Hah! Yes, but you have to deal with the not running crazies!


Debbie Woodruff recently posted\u2026The Art (and some science) of the Marathon Taper


This post gave me major race anxiety. I know it wasn’t meant to but it triggered race day panic! Otherwise, fantastic post!


Rachel recently posted\u2026How to Pick The Perfect Running Shoe


Oops, sorry! It was supposed to do the opposite!


Debbie Woodruff recently posted\u2026The Art (and some science) of the Marathon Taper


I think this is the best post I have read explaining the taper. I’ve not trained for a full marathon just half- but great explanation!


Mary Beth Jackson recently posted\u2026Fall Running Wish list!


Thank you! I’m happy that you find it helpful. The tips also work for a half, just less time needed for a taper, only 10 days to two weeks.


Debbie Woodruff recently posted\u2026The Art (and some science) of the Marathon Taper


These are great tips!


I’ve only done one marathon (and that was enough for me, thanks very much), and I can’t really remember what all happened during the taper. I’m sure it was ugly, because I was a hot mess LOL. If I were to do it again, I would pay more attention, because I’m sure I made some big mistakes in that time period.


Jenn recently posted\u2026running with ernie


We all make mistakes in our first marathon. Hopefully we learn from them.


Debbie Woodruff recently posted\u2026The Art (and some science) of the Marathon Taper


Maybe I will see you there. I have sang at the NYC marathon for the past two years, rooting all of you amazing runners on.


This is really great info! I’ll start tapering in the next few weeks, and this will be my first time. I’ve heard many people talk about it, but it’s nice to read a more detailed explanation.


Very interesting, I will have to pass this on to my son. Thanks.


Patrick Weseman recently posted\u2026Facebook Farmers Market


Great tips! I feel like my training is never fully complete so I take those last few wks and try to cram more miles in instead of tapering ( I know it’s not right) I need to work on that.


lacey@fairytalesandfitness recently posted\u2026Fitness Friday


Since I am a sideline marathoner i.e. I cheer the runner on\u2026I havent tried out any of the above techniques let alone tapering. Maybe I should get off the sidelines and do one!


I’ve done two halfs now and have been more intrigued by marathon training!


Marathon training is hard. Very hard. You are pushing your body to its limits, running mileage that makes your friends’ jaws drop, training intensively for months, working toward the goal of finishing that 26.2 miles with pride. Whether you’re an elite athlete trying to win, an age group champion trying to set a new personal record, or looking to achieve your goal of running your first marathon, you’ve been following your training plan to the letter. And now your plan says it is time for your marathon taper.


Some athletes will say that the marathon taper is the most challenging part of training. It is also a vital component to your overall marathon training.


Some athletes will say that the marathon taper is the most challenging part of training. Your body has adapted to the stress that you have been piling on week after week, so a hard workout or a long run doesn’t even faze you. But cutting back your mileage? Slowing down? Actually resting? That might be just a little scary.


Part of the challenge really is physical. As your race approaches, you may feel a normal amount of anxiety about your ability and your readiness. How would you normally handle stress? By going for a run, of course, an outlet that is temporarily limited or cut off for you.


It is probably the mental aspect of the marathon taper than can really get to you though. After training so hard for so long, it is hard not to feel like you might be losing your edge as you cut back your mileage and intensity. Many runners make the mistake of running too fast or too long, because they either feel they might be losing fitness, or because their legs feel so good, they let themselves go with the flow.


The point of tapering, of course, is to allow your body the time to rest and repair after all of that hard training. With a proper taper, which includes an appropriate nutrition plan, you will arrive at the start of your marathon well fueled, fully hydrated, and with fresh legs, ready to follow your race day plan and achieve your marathon goals. Here is a week by week plan to get you there.


Marathon Taper Week Three


While some experts have differing opinions, there is a general consensus that you should cut your mileage back to about 80-90% when you are three weeks away from your marathon.


Obviously, this is all relative to your total mileage during your training. If you’ve been running high mileage, 100 miles a week or more, your first week of your marathon taper may still total 80 to 90 miles.


On the other hand, if your mileage topped out at 50, you should plan to run about 40-45 miles during this week.


You should cut a few miles off of your long run this week too. Depending on the distance of your longest run, plan to cut about 10-20%. If you topped off at 20 miles, shorten your long run to about 16-18.


Intensity: At this point in training, all of your higher intensity runs should be targeted at your marathon. This is not the time for 400 meter intervals. Marathon pace tempo runs, with some faster intervals of half marathon pace are great for this week of the taper.


Nutrition: You don’t need to make many changes during this week of your marathon taper. Hopefully, throughout your training you have been eating a diet rich in complex carbohydrates, lean proteins, and healthy fats. Your focus for the last three weeks of your training will be to build glycogen stores, which will help to fuel you through your race. This will be accomplished by reducing total calories as you reduce your mileage, but keeping up a high carbohydrate intake.


Common Mistakes: Frequent mistakes during this period including cutting your mileage by too much, eating too many junk or “white”carbohydrates, or keeping the intensity too high. Remember, with the exception of one or two marathon/half marathon pace runs, all your other runs should be easy, moderate distance runs.


Marathon Tapering Week Two


This week you should reduce your mileage to about 60-70% of your maximum. This is actually easier than the previous week, because you will take a significant number of miles off of your long run, to about 50% of your peak distance. The rest of your runs should be trimmed accordingly.


Intensity: This week you will complete one moderate intensity run at a reduced distance. This workout should again be marathon specific. This is a great time to practice your marathon pace, with a little half marathon pace or slightly faster thrown in. Try to complete this workout toward the beginning of the week, so that you have at least 10 days until your marathon to recover.


Nutrition: This week, because your mileage is significantly less than at your peak, you should cut down on your calorie intake, while continuing to eat complex carbs. Protein and fats are still important, just make sure they are high quality, and that you reduce your portion sizes.


Common Mistakes: Eating too much, which can lead to a bloated feeling and possible weight gain. Running at too high of an intensity. Keep it slow and easy, with the exception of the one medium intensity workout.


Marathon Taper Week One


The final week of the marathon taper may very well be the most difficult. Your body is rested and feeling strong, tempting you to run “just a little bit farther.”Your continued high carbohydrate diet is doing it’s job, topping off your glycogen stores in preparation for the race, but it also increases your fluid retention (which is also good), but may lead to a small weight gain.


This week you should reduce your mileage to about a third of your maximum (excluding marathon day). Your daily runs are short, and you can take an extra day off. It’s a good idea to run a little the day before the marathon, just about one to three miles, to help blood flow in your legs and to help reduce tension.


Intensity: Try one short mid-level intensity during the week. After a short warm up, run a couple miles at marathon pace, then follow that up with a short cool down. This will reinforce your goal pace again. You can use this run as a dress rehearsal, wearing your race shoes and clothing, just to make sure everything fits and feels right.


Nutrition: With the reduced mileage you will want to cut down again on your calories, but continue the quality carbohydrate consumption. Don’t forget a little protein and fat, which are important, but the focus this week is really on the carbs. They will help you with hydration too, so make sure to drink plenty of liquid all week, and, as you get closer to race day, avoid alcohol and coffee consumption. They both promote dehydration, so if you do indulge, do so with moderation.


Common Mistakes: Too much intensity during your last few workouts. Eating too much or not eating quality food. Remember that a little weight gain is normal, and indicates that you have been eating and drinking enough. Your body will use the glycogen that you have stored, which in turn retains fluid which will keep you hydrated.


Follow these tips and you will arrive at the start line well rested, fueled, and adequately hydrated, and ready to furn a successful marathon. For race day tips to get you through those 26.2 miles, check out this post.


Do you have any tips for the taper (marathon or shorter race)? Did you make any of the common mistakes during your taper?


And Now it’s Time for the Running Coaches’ Corner!


My weekly linkups! Please stop by and check out all of the great recipes, workouts, and information that all these awesome bloggers share every week!


Meatless Monday with Sarah and Deborah


Meatless Monday with Annmarie and Rachel


Inspire Me Monday with Janice


Anything Goes with Marilyn


Wild Workout Wednesday with Annmarie, Michelle, Jen, and Nicole


The Plant Based Potluck Party with Deborah


The Running Coaches’ Corner with Rachel, Suz, Lora Marie, and Me!


Giveaway Roundup and Try Out Thursdays with Smitha


The Blogger’s Pit Stop with Kathleen, Janice, Julie and Me!


Living a Life of Fitness, Health and Happiness with Jill


Original article and pictures take http://coachdebbieruns.com/marathon-taper site

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